Fibrant Living: Chronic Illnesses & Education

I’m most­ly post­ing a note here for ease of record­keep­ing for Blog365, but I also know a fair num­ber of peo­ple who suf­fer from migraines or oth­er chron­ic ill­ness­es and prob­a­bly don’t read Fibrant Liv­ing. Today’s post is over there, and has a point­er to a good resource for any­one who has headaches.

The Value of Education for Chronic Illness Patients

Paula Kamen, author of All In My Head, talks about the val­ue of edu­ca­tion in cop­ing with chron­ic ill­ness in an excel­lent edi­to­r­i­al in the New York Times.
Leav­ing the Rab­bit Hole. This pas­sage, in par­tic­u­lar, spoke to me:

The worst thing, to me, about hav­ing a non-stop mul­ti-year headache isn’t nec­es­sar­i­ly the pain. Or the way it tends to dis­rupt inti­mate rela­tion­ships, emp­ty all finan­cial reserves, and sab­o­tage the best-laid career plans. It’s not even the end­less bar­rage of (albeit well-mean­ing) sug­ges­tions for “cures” from every­one you meet, most of which you’ve already tried any­way (except for the colon cleans­ing and the Jews for Jesus con­ver­sion).

No, it’s the emo­tion­al suf­fer­ing – from all the guilt and the shame, of patients like me think­ing it’s our entire fault, and maybe all in our heads.

She also men­tions a good site for any­one who has prob­lems with migraines, Rob­bins Headache Clin­ic.

Brief Update and Review of Witch Way to Murder

I’ve been doing so much read­ing because I’ve been sick and unable to do much else. We did get the girl to her doc­tor, so we know there’s no strep around here. The doc­tor would­n’t rule out mono, but would­n’t test for it either. (I don’t real­ly like this woman, and we usu­al­ly try to go when the nicer physi­cian is there.) She said that since they don’t do any­thing but treat the symp­toms if it is mono, and the con­ta­gion peri­od would have been 60–90 days ago, she does­n’t see any rea­son to run a test.
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Review: Prom Nights From Hell

So, um, I tried to read this. I real­ly did. I don’t know if it’s “para­nor­mal romance over­load” or the fact that I’d just fin­ished read­ing mate­r­i­al from two incred­i­bly good writ­ers (Sarah Mon­ette and Eliz­a­beth Bear), but I had no patience for the fluff. Over­all, I gave the book a 2/10.

Cover of Prom Dates From Hell
i did get through “The Exter­mi­na­tor’s Daugh­ter” Meg Cabot. I don’t intend to read any­thing else by her. Yes, it was bet­ter than oral surgery, but I wish I’d spent the time clean­ing the sink or some­thing. To her cred­it, I did have a “laugh out loud” moment ear­ly on, when she used the phrase “tramp stamp.” I had­n’t heard that before, and I love it (although “arse antlers” is prob­a­bly still my favorite).
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Review: New Amsterdam

I’m all infat­u­at­ed with yet anoth­er author, my friends, so I must warn you that you’ll be read­ing much more about Eliz­a­beth Bear here in com­ing weeks.

Cover of New Amsterdam by Elizabeth BearNew Ams­ter­dam is an anthol­o­gy of con­nect­ed sto­ries twined around two main char­ac­ters. “The Great Detec­tive” is vam­pire Sebastien de Ulloa. Lady Abi­gail Irene Gar­rett is a foren­sic sor­ceror, Detec­tive Crown Inves­ti­ga­tor in His Majesty’s Ser­vice in the colony of New Ams­ter­dam. At the begin­ning of the 20th cen­tu­ry, North Amer­i­ca is still a patch­work of Euro­pean colonies, with all the atten­dant polit­i­cal intrigue and mil­i­tary ten­sion.
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Boo Sickness! Recipe, Word Geeking, Reviews

This not-flu or what­ev­er is exceed­ing­ly tire­some. I should think it would be enough to live with the day to day stuff, let alone put up with this. Then again, nobody has ever claimed in my hear­ing that the world is fair.

MélusineI haven’t suc­ceed­ed in hold­ing any thoughts in my head long, so you’re in for ran­dom­ness again this entry.

I have no idea why the main arti­cle was linked from ZDNet, but does­n’t this ched­dar and apple sand­wich seem yum­my? I won­der how it would be with ham? I used to have a real­ly good recipe for a sausage and apples dish, but I know I haven’t cooked it in the last decade. Maybe I could dig it out of my ancient recipe box? There are few ways to go wrong with cooked apples, as far as I can tell.
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Happy V‑Day!

Hap­py Valen­tine’s Day to all, whether you’re part of a cou­ple (tri­ad, quad, etc.) or not 🙂

Sam­bear brought home truf­fles and flow­ers! And iTunesi­ness! And then he went and cooked deli­cious steaks for din­ner!

My baby girl’s sweet­ie has mono. Ewww. They had to put off their spe­cial din­ner tonight ’til after he’s feel­ing bet­ter. Hope­ful­ly he’ll get over it more eas­i­ly than she did a few years back! Since she and I have had some sort of flu-thing that we caught from him, I know the poor guy is hav­ing rot­ten luck. Flu, then mono? Ick!

I spent a ridicu­lous amount of time look­ing at the pho­tos Char­lie over at The Dai­ly Coy­ote. I don’t think it would have occurred to me to call a coy­ote “cute,” until I saw this. He’s a very well-behaved coy­ote, raised with lots of help from a cat. ‘d love to show you one of Char­lie’s pho­tos here, but I don’t want vio­late his Mom’s copy­right. Go look!

In the not-fun part of the world, the CDC says that at least 82 kids have died in the US play­ing “the chok­ing game.” I will admit that I ini­tial­ly assumed they were talk­ing about acci­dents involv­ing auto­erot­ic asphyx­i­a­tion, but those are actu­al­ly count­ed sep­a­rate­ly. Who­dathunkit?

The play­ers are most­ly ath­letes and well-behaved kids who want to get a “high” feel­ing with­out drugs or alco­hol. Those who have died were all play­ing alone. The researchers do state that the sta­tis­tics aren’t reli­able, because there’s not a sep­a­rate cat­e­go­ry for coro­ners to use to dif­fer­en­ti­ate sui­cide from a pos­si­ble “game” gone wrong, but the expec­ta­tion is that the prob­lem is being under­stat­ed rather than over­stat­ed.

I real­ly hope my daugh­ter knows that even tem­po­rary loss of oxy­gen to the brain can cause brain dam­age, but if she did­n’t before, she will by tomor­row. She isn’t in the prime age group for this but of crazi­ness, but it’s eas­i­er to talk to your chil­dren than to bury them. I know, just 82 in how many years? But that’s 82 young peo­ple who might be alive if they’d had a bet­ter under­stand­ing of phys­i­ol­o­gy, at the very least.

SBQ: Starting Over?

The Stitch­ing Blog­gers’ Ques­tion of the Week is:

Do you have any projects that you have scrapped and start­ed over? What made you start over from scratch?

Celtic Cross designed by Deb Davis for Y-Knot Designs

I can only remem­ber one, and I restart­ed it at least twice, maybe three times. It was the Celtic Cross designed by Deb Davis for Y‑Knot Designs. I think I tried start­ing with one of the cor­ners, but kept find­ing myself off a bit, so I frogged every­thing and start­ed from the mid­dle, as I usu­al­ly do. I still kept get­ting off by just a thread here or there, so I do think I frogged all that again, then start­ed from the cen­ter again but work­ing in a dif­fer­ent direc­tion. I’m very pleased with how it turned out, but I think it was the last piece I did on linen instead of even­weave.

What do you want to read or hear?

I record­ed some more pieces, but need to wait for Sam to “pro­duce” them (clean them up and add appro­pri­ate music). One of them isn’t some­thing I would have cho­sen myself, but Todd, who cre­at­ed Live Read­ings, asked to hear oth­ers read it. It turned out bet­ter than I thought it would. And it was fun to do some­thing that I would­n’t have cho­sen.

So it’s request time! What would you like me to record, or write about?
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