Good Article About Source of FM Pain

Fibromyalgia Pain: Do We Know the Source?

Roland Staud
Abstract

Purpose of review: Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a chronic pain condition of unknown origin. Multiple abnormalities have been described, including peripheral tissue and central nervous system changes. The relation of these mechanisms, however, is likely bidirectional. FMS pain clearly depends on peripheral nociceptive input as well as abnormal central pain processing. This review will focus on the role of peripheral nociceptive input for pain in FMS.

Recent findings: There is strong evidence for abnormal central pain processing in FMS. Sensitized spinal cord neurons in the dorsal horn are responsible for augmented pain processing of nociceptive signals from the periphery. In addition, glial activation, possibly by cytokines and excitatory amino acids may play a role in the initiation and perpetuation of this sensitized state.

Summary: Nociceptive input clearly plays an important role in FMS. Acute or repetitive tissue injury has been associated with FMS pain. Cytokines related to such injuries may be responsible for long-term activation of spinal cord glia and dorsal horn neurons, thus resulting in central sensitization. A better understanding of these important neuro-immune interactions may provide relevant insights into future effective therapies.

(Medscape does require registration, but it’s free—and a great resource.)

Cyn is Rick's wife, Katie's Mom, and Esther & Oliver's Mémé. She's also a professional geek, avid reader, fledgling coder, enthusiastic gamer (TTRPGs), occasional singer, and devoted stitcher.
Posts created 4264

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Related Posts

Begin typing your search term above and press enter to search. Press ESC to cancel.

Back To Top