It Is the Flu

And now I have it, too. Damn it. I had tried to get back to blog­ging dai­ly, but good inten­tions just did­n’t hold a can­dle against the entire house­hold com­ing down with the flu.1

For some rea­son I thought Tam­i­flu was a one or two-pill affair, but I sup­pose I had it con­fused with one of the oth­er antivi­rals. I have to take this for ten days! And appar­ent­ly it gives quite a few peo­ple stom­ach flu symp­toms on top of the mis­ery they’re already in or try­ing to avoid. Hap­pi­ly, that isn’t hap­pen­ing to me so far.

I’m not feel­ing very chat­ty, though. So I think I’m going to curl up with the new deliv­ery of mail­box books from the library and apply myself to some brain­less read­ing. Any­thing that requires brain will have to be sent back and request­ed again some oth­er time, because I won’t be able to appre­ci­ate it. (I admit­ted that I was sick when I kept re-read­ing the same few pages of Halt­ing State with absolute­ly no trace of com­pre­hen­sion.) Now I wish I’d made dif­fer­ent selec­tions!


1 Kiyoshi isn’t infect­ed, but he isn’t very help­ful at the best of times.

The Flu? But That’s Why We Had Shots!

My girl has the flu! And she had not one, but two flu shots this year! She caught it from her sweet­ie down at Geor­gia Tech, and if there’s a place in Geor­gia that’s more inter­na­tion­al than the air­port, that’s it. So I sup­pose it’s one of those strains that she was­n’t vac­ci­nat­ed against. But still!

The young infec­tion vec­tor was giv­en a pre­scrip­tion for Tam­i­flu, but I haven’t heard much more about his con­di­tion since the vis­it to the stu­dent clin­ic. She’s bare­ly able to stay upright, but want­ed to go down to stay with him (his moth­er appar­ent­ly hav­ing offered her a ride dur­ing one of her trips to deliv­er a care pack­age). He kind­ly offered to take care of her so as to avoid infect­ing the bear and I. As sweet as that is, I don’t real­ly think it wise to have the two sick kids depen­dent on each oth­er, no mat­ter how good their inten­tions may be.

Yes, I am a Mean, Mean Mom­my, but she’s sleep­ing too much to real­ly protest. There’s also the fact that she can’t stand to speak much due to the sore throat. Of course, she’s curled up in our bed, which is the pre­ferred refuge for sick chil­dren, even when they’re All Grown Up at 19. Kyoshi is keep­ing a close eye on her, with breaks to check on the angle of sun­light in the kitchen and liv­ing room.

Flu. Mono. Whatever.

What­ev­er it is, it sucks. No mat­ter how long Katie and I sleep, we stay exhaust­ed.

We did watch more Dex­ter while we were awake. And I stud­ied for my Project Man­age­ment final. I’m actu­al­ly using the study guide, like a good girl! Hey, my brain is so stu­pid right now that I need all the help I can get. Maybe I should have read some of the text, huh?

Oh! I fin­ished Shirley Dams­gaard’s Ophe­lia & Abby series. Very good stuff! They’re cozy mys­ter­ies, but there’s also an inter­est­ing por­tray­al of peo­ple fol­low­ing a “fam­i­ly tra­di­tion” of folk mag­ic.1

On to Stranger in Death!


1 I have to say that the ref­er­ences to “witch­es” have caused some inter­est­ing changes in the ads Google is stick­ing on this site. Love spells? Please!

I Have Done More Than Twittering!

For one thing, I have sev­er­al draft posts sit­ting around here, but I haven’t been able to stay focused long enough to fin­ish any of them.

Sam caught some kind of flu-like crud, which Katie and I both caught, of course. Now he seems to be get­ting it again, which is gross­ly unfair. Poor bear!

The girl is final­ly feel­ing a wee bit bet­ter, but she still had a fever last night. We aren’t with my fam­i­ly today, because we’re too wor­ried about get­ting the twins sick. They’re still so tiny!

I should be stitch­ing. I want to be stitch­ing. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, it seems that I need to add a good mag­ni­fi­er to my Ott Lite, and maybe get my eyes checked/glasses changed, too. My eyes go all wog­gly every time I try to focus on the linen now. Very annoy­ing!

One of the few things I have fin­ished late­ly is lots of library-enabled read­ing. That has includ­ed Bone of Con­tention and Chains of Fol­ly by Rober­ta Gel­lis, the third and fourth books in her Magde­lene la Bâtarde series. Magde­lene is a whoremistress in medieval Eng­land whose House is reg­is­tered on the tax rolls an Embroi­dery shop. She and her women do, in fact, pro­duce and sell fine needle­work, but that isn’t their main source of income.

This is one of two series I learned about when I was read­ing rec.crafts.textiles.needlework. I’m glad, as would have been very unlike­ly to run across them with­out the rec­om­men­da­tion.

I have some­thing to con­fess: I am guilty of judg­ing some books by their cov­ers. And if I’d seen Chains of Fol­ly first, with­out already know­ing that Gel­lis is a good author and I enjoy this par­tic­u­lar series, I would­n’t have had any rea­son to pick it up for a look. I might have tak­en it for a text­book edi­tion of some­thing fre­quent­ly assigned to lit­er­a­ture class­es (read: bor­ing!), but not the lat­est vol­ume in a good series by an estab­lished, award-win­ning author. Tor/Forge pub­lished the first three, and they were of much high­er qual­i­ty than what Five Star Books has put out.

That Tor/Forge did­n’t buy book four tells me that Gel­lis prob­a­bly had a con­tract for a tril­o­gy, but it did­n’t sell as well as the pub­lish­er hoped, so they weren’t inter­est­ed in more of that tale. Still, I loved the first two books, and was def­i­nite­ly pay­ing atten­tion to see if there was a third, but did­n’t hear that it was actu­al­ly out until recent­ly. It was pub­lished in 2002! I know that Gel­lis is one of the authors I put in my Ama­zon “Eyes” list (which seems to have stopped work­ing at some point), and I did­n’t hear a thing. I have to won­der if the pub­lish­er just did­n’t both­er to mar­ket the book at all.

These days, Gel­lis is bet­ter known for co-author­ing fan­ta­sy books with Mer­cedes Lack­ey. That’s too bad, as her his­tor­i­cal fic­tion is rich­ly detailed and authen­tic. Lack­ey’s name has been used to sell so much crap that I just don’t both­er any more, even if I like what the co-author has done on her own. Any­thing Lack­ey has touched in the last decade, at least, is for­mu­la­ic and trite. There were some good points in some of her ear­li­er books, which I might even be able to re-read some day—but after the first few trilo­gies they were just too pre­dictable.

I also read two books by Vic­ki Pet­ters­son this week, the lat­est book in Tanya Huf­f’s Con­fed­er­a­tion series, and Her Roy­al Spy­ness by Rhys Bowen. That last jumped off the new book shelves at me because of the cute name and nice cov­er. I don’t know that I’ll read any­thing else by Bowen, but it was an inter­est­ing depar­ture for me.

I’ve got sev­er­al books of poet­ry and some non-fic­tion in the mix, as well. I tend to read those in lit­tle nib­bles, as I like to think about the poems rather than rat­tle on through them. I’ll share some of that soon.