Adult: FMS from What?

I have a Google Alerts search going for “fibromyal­gia,” because if there’s some­thing out there that will make this crap bet­ter, I want to know it yes­ter­day. The alert brings in all sorts of non­sense from quack reme­dies to naysay­ers, in addi­tion to the actu­al content.

Today’s alert takes the cake, though. Some­body wrote to Dan Sav­age’s Sav­age Love col­umn ask­ing, “Can I Sue Some­body for Fist­ing-Induced Fibromyal­gia?“1

Sav­age’s med­ical expert is out of touch regard­ing the lat­est FMS research, but I have to agree with his reply to the letter-writer.

Sam and I tried to game a lit­tle tonight, but he was sleepy and I’m fad­ing, too. I did some writ­ing today, and more web­i­fy­ing, and worked on a cou­ple of school assign­ments. Then I got all-too-obsessed with try­ing to fig­ure out how to make the out­put of a cou­ple of Word­Press plu­g­ins work nice­ly with my template.

I hope y’all had a love­ly weekend!


1 http://www.villagevoice.com/people/0806,savage,79044,24.html

Responses to various comments about ME and FMS

Some of the com­ments are pret­ty old by now, but there are cer­tain themes that come back, over and over again. I’ve decid­ed to answer them once, and that’s it.

ME and FMS are not “lifestyle” dis­eases. Researchers have found genet­ic, neu­ro­log­i­cal and car­di­o­log­i­cal anom­alies, so get off that blame-the-vic­tim bull­shit. We know bet­ter. We’ve done the diet and exer­cise dance. We’ve tried air-clean­ers and remov­ing tox­ins and nat­ur­al cleansers and vit­a­mins and health foods, and while some of them are nicer than the alter­na­tives, they can­not cure chron­ic fatigue syn­drome or fibromyal­gia because they are not part of the cause.

While we’re at it, no, alien abduc­tions don’t cause FMS, either. I know you’re laugh­ing, but there real­ly is site out there that makes such claims. No, I won’t link to it. It’s bad enough that it exists!

“Chron­ic Fatigue Syn­drome” is a total­ly inad­e­quate name for a dis­or­der whose suf­fer­ers expe­ri­ence far, far, more than a lit­tle tired­ness. That’s why we have a new and bet­ter name for CFS, as of Jan­u­ary 2007: ME/CFS, or myal­gic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syn­drome. The dis­ease has been known as ME all along in the rest of the world, although some­times the acronym was used for myal­gic encephalomyelitis. Per­son­al­ly, I pre­ferred one of the oth­er sug­ges­tions, chron­ic neu­roen­docrineim­mune dys­func­tion syn­drome (CNDS), but I was­n’t on the committee.

I would hap­pi­ly rename fibromyal­gia “you don’t want to be me” or “betray­al by entire body, tak­ing your mind with it,” but I don’t think any­body is sug­gest­ing that it be renamed. The name just does­n’t seem ade­quate to its impact, though it’s a lit­tle bet­ter than some of the old­er names, like “rheuma­tism.”

To oth­ers who have said “pre­ven­tion is bet­ter than cure.” Well, yes, and “a stitch in time saves 9.” Yup. I’ve got plen­ty of apho­risms, too. Tell me, pray, how one “pre­vents” dis­or­ders whose ori­gin is unclear? As I said above, researchers have iden­ti­fied genet­ic anom­alies. We have fair­ly good evi­dence that fibromyal­gia, at least, has a genet­ic com­po­nent. We’ve got brain scans show­ing that fibromites’ brains react dif­fer­ent­ly to painful stim­uli, and oth­er tests show­ing that our spinal flu­id has much high­er lev­els of a neu­ropep­tide involved in trans­mit­ting pain impuls­es than non-fibromites. 

With that in mind, how would you go about “pre­vent­ing” fibromyal­gia? Advis­ing us not to breed? Many of us have already done so by the time we’re diagnosed—and, of course, that can’t help us when we’ve already got the dis­ease. We can use our own diag­noses as warn­ings that our own chil­dren may have a sus­cep­ti­bil­i­ty to fibromyal­gia, but what then? Smoth­er them in cot­ton bat­ting, to keep them from expe­ri­ence any stres­sors in life that might set off the FMS bomb in their genes?

Being fat does­n’t cause ME or FMS, either, although it’s com­mon to gain weight after devel­op­ing either dis­or­der. I don’t know any­one who is able to main­tain the lev­el of activ­i­ty he or she did before falling ill, and many of the drugs used to treat the symp­toms of these dis­or­ders cause weight gain. Los­ing weight is even more dif­fi­cult for us than for oth­er peo­ple. Telling us that we’d feel bet­ter if we lost weight is not help­ful in the least. I’ve nev­er once heard of any­one who was “cured” of FMS or ME because he or she lost weight—and if it were hap­pen­ing, I would know it, because I pay a lot of atten­tion to these things.

Even if I thought weight loss offered a “cure,” or even ame­lio­ra­tion of symp­toms, I see no rea­son to dis­cuss drugs like Xeni­cal at any length. Any drug or pro­ce­dure promis­ing weight loss will has an easy time get­ting approved because of our soci­ety’s hatred of fat peo­ple. Fen-phen, any­one? “Oh, the drug will kill some patients, or leave them with per­ma­nent heart dam­age? Hell, it’s worth it if there’s a chance of los­ing weight!” The weight-lossself-hatred indus­try has more than enough mon­ey and pow­er to lube their way past any flim­sy lit­tle reg­u­la­tions stand­ing in their way. 

Diet and sports and their rela­tion to weight are anoth­er thing all togeth­er, and beyond the scope of this blog. I rec­om­mend you to peruse the worlds of the delight­ful Sandy Szwarc over at Junk­food Sci­ence, who does cov­er that top­ic, fre­quent­ly, thor­ough­ly, and well.

Pain cures for women; Migraines from low-energy light bulbs

I’ve had these two sto­ries book­marked to post here for a bit, so it seems past time for me to actu­al­ly do it.

The best new pain cures, with a focus on women

Many women have a tough time find­ing the right kind of relief for their pain –and for good rea­son: Until recent­ly, experts had­n’t actu­al­ly stud­ied wom­en’s pain specif­i­cal­ly, and most research was­n’t con­duct­ed with a wom­an’s hor­mones and physique in mind. All that’s chang­ing, though.

Docs now know that to ban­ish our aches, they must devel­op treat­ments for­mu­lat­ed for wom­en’s bod­ies. What’s more, researchers are also look­ing for — and find­ing — ways to head pain off at the pass, so those of us with chron­ic trou­bles such as migraine, fibromyal­gia, or back­ache don’t have to be hob­bled by pain on a dai­ly basis. Here, how the new research will help you live an (almost) pain-free life. Health.com: Smart ways to ban­ish pain

It’s def­i­nite­ly good news that they’re doing the research, at least! There’s good infor­ma­tion here on how estro­gen and oth­er hor­mones affect the cen­tral ner­vous sys­tem. The arti­cle specif­i­cal­ly men­tions treat­ment for migraines and oth­er headaches, fibromyal­gia, and chron­ic fatigue syndrome.

There’s a def­i­nite anti-painkiller bias in the arti­cle, unfor­tu­nate­ly. The author does­n’t seem to grasp the fact that ibupro­fen isn’t enough “pre­ven­tive med­i­cine” for some of us, but if you can look past that it’s a decent article.

Low-ener­gy bulbs ’cause migraine’

I’ve had con­cerns about this issue myself. Flu­o­res­cent bulbs have always been a prob­lem for me, and the “low-ener­gy” bulbs that are so pop­u­lar now are flu­o­res­cent. The flick­er­ing of flu­o­res­cent bulbs can also trig­ger seizures in epilep­tics. While man­u­fac­tur­ers claim that the new bulbs don’t flick­er, they still cause prob­lems for some peo­ple. Eye strain from the low-inten­si­ty light is cit­ed, but some of us do per­ceive flickering. 

The U.K. plans to ban the sale of con­ven­tion­al (incan­des­cent) bulbs with­in the next four years. Patients’ asso­ci­a­tions are ask­ing that the old­er bulbs remain avail­able for those who have issues with the new­er ones.

This arti­cle did­n’t hap­pen to men­tion anoth­er prob­lem with the dis­pos­al of the bulbs: they con­tain mer­cury. You can’t just toss them in the trash, and if one breaks you have an envi­ron­men­tal haz­ard. That cost is sel­dom men­tioned when peo­ple talk about how much can be saved by switch­ing to those bulbs. When I looked for legal ways to dis­pose of the bulbs here in Atlanta1, all of the results involved pay­ing $1 or more per bulb. How many peo­ple are going to do that? Not many, which means that the bulbs will go into land­fills, releas­ing the mercury.

In look­ing for a cita­tion regard­ing the dis­pos­al prob­lems, I came across anoth­er arti­cle that states that the flu­o­res­cent bulbs also cause skin heal­ing prob­lems for those who are pho­to­sen­si­tive due to lupus, eczema, or oth­er conditions.

I think we’ll keep buy­ing the full-spec­trum incan­des­cent bulbs for now.


1 I used Earth911, an excel­lent site for any­one in the U.S.

Not Dead Yet!

I haven’t giv­en up on this blog, either. Or even the long-miss­ing pod­cast! I don’t know why I haven’t post­ed in so long, hon­est­ly. I’ve been in a very qui­et time, but it’s time to leave the shell.

I have had more health prob­lems, and I’m on more med­ica­tions now. I’ve added a wheel­chair to the walk­er and cane, and need an elec­tric chair or scooter.

At the same time, I’ve con­stant­ly read things and thought, “I should post that to Fibrant Living.”

So I am, now. I hope some of you are still reading!

Related podcasts

There are two oth­er pod­casts that I know of for “fibromites,” as one group calls peo­ple with fibromyalgia. 

Bet­sy Singh-Anand is a nurse, and her med­ical back­ground is reflect­ed in her pod­cast Fibromyal­gia Week­ly. Her feed has­n’t been updat­ed since March, but I hope she’ll be able to change that before too long. I encour­age you to down­load her old­er shows, as they’re well worth a listen.

Juliann Krute’s pod­cast It Won’t Kill You gives an excel­lent view of what it’s like to live with fibromyal­gia and oth­er dis­abil­i­ties. She has pre­sent­ed some excel­lent infor­ma­tion on the show in the past, but has been on hia­tus due to “the ever­last­ing sore throat.” I hope to hear a new pod­cast from her soon. Again, the shows she has done are very much worth hearing.

Fibrant Liv­ing owes much to these ladies’ work, as they helped me to know that there would be peo­ple inter­est­ed in lis­ten­ing to a show about fibromyal­gia, chron­ic fatigue and oth­er ill­ness­es. Fibrant Liv­ing has a dif­fer­ent “angle” than their shows, and has no inten­tion of try­ing to replace either of them, of course! I’ll con­tin­ue to sub­scribe to enjoy any­thing they put out, and I encour­age all of you to do the same.

Namaste,
Cyn