Pain cures for women; Migraines from low-energy light bulbs

I’ve had these two sto­ries book­marked to post here for a bit, so it seems past time for me to actu­al­ly do it.

The best new pain cures, with a focus on women

Many women have a tough time find­ing the right kind of relief for their pain –and for good rea­son: Until recent­ly, experts had­n’t actu­al­ly stud­ied wom­en’s pain specif­i­cal­ly, and most research was­n’t con­duct­ed with a wom­an’s hor­mones and physique in mind. All that’s chang­ing, though.

Docs now know that to ban­ish our aches, they must devel­op treat­ments for­mu­lat­ed for wom­en’s bod­ies. What’s more, researchers are also look­ing for — and find­ing — ways to head pain off at the pass, so those of us with chron­ic trou­bles such as migraine, fibromyal­gia, or back­ache don’t have to be hob­bled by pain on a dai­ly basis. Here, how the new research will help you live an (almost) pain-free life. Health.com: Smart ways to ban­ish pain

It’s def­i­nite­ly good news that they’re doing the research, at least! There’s good infor­ma­tion here on how estro­gen and oth­er hor­mones affect the cen­tral ner­vous sys­tem. The arti­cle specif­i­cal­ly men­tions treat­ment for migraines and oth­er headaches, fibromyal­gia, and chron­ic fatigue syn­drome.

There’s a def­i­nite anti-painkiller bias in the arti­cle, unfor­tu­nate­ly. The author does­n’t seem to grasp the fact that ibupro­fen isn’t enough “pre­ven­tive med­i­cine” for some of us, but if you can look past that it’s a decent arti­cle.

Low-ener­gy bulbs ’cause migraine’

I’ve had con­cerns about this issue myself. Flu­o­res­cent bulbs have always been a prob­lem for me, and the “low-ener­gy” bulbs that are so pop­u­lar now are flu­o­res­cent. The flick­er­ing of flu­o­res­cent bulbs can also trig­ger seizures in epilep­tics. While man­u­fac­tur­ers claim that the new bulbs don’t flick­er, they still cause prob­lems for some peo­ple. Eye strain from the low-inten­si­ty light is cit­ed, but some of us do per­ceive flick­er­ing.

The U.K. plans to ban the sale of con­ven­tion­al (incan­des­cent) bulbs with­in the next four years. Patients’ asso­ci­a­tions are ask­ing that the old­er bulbs remain avail­able for those who have issues with the new­er ones.

This arti­cle did­n’t hap­pen to men­tion anoth­er prob­lem with the dis­pos­al of the bulbs: they con­tain mer­cury. You can’t just toss them in the trash, and if one breaks you have an envi­ron­men­tal haz­ard. That cost is sel­dom men­tioned when peo­ple talk about how much can be saved by switch­ing to those bulbs. When I looked for legal ways to dis­pose of the bulbs here in Atlanta1, all of the results involved pay­ing $1 or more per bulb. How many peo­ple are going to do that? Not many, which means that the bulbs will go into land­fills, releas­ing the mer­cury.

In look­ing for a cita­tion regard­ing the dis­pos­al prob­lems, I came across anoth­er arti­cle that states that the flu­o­res­cent bulbs also cause skin heal­ing prob­lems for those who are pho­to­sen­si­tive due to lupus, eczema, or oth­er con­di­tions.

I think we’ll keep buy­ing the full-spec­trum incan­des­cent bulbs for now.


1 I used Earth911, an excel­lent site for any­one in the U.S.

Some of Today’s News in Atlanta

I man­aged to avoid the crime news, which is always hor­rif­ic. Okay, I most­ly avoid­ed it. The three boys under 10 who are being charged with kid­nap­ping and rape1 is get­ting to me. That poor lit­tle girl!

Transgender candidate misled voters, suit alleges2

Actu­al­ly, these guys seem to be suing every­body but the dog­catch­er down there in Riverdale.

What does Ms. Bruce’s gen­der have to do with how she’ll per­form as a city coun­cil mem­ber? Noth­ing, of course Ir’s been brought up because a cou­ple of sore losers just won’t let go. Ass­hats!

Trumpet the news: Elephant is going to be a mom3

But she won’t deliv­er until some­where around April 1, 2009! 22 months of preg­nan­cy. Dum­bo nev­er men­tioned that lit­tle fact.

In metro Atlanta, profile of those in need during the holidays has changed4

It isn’t just dur­ing the hol­i­days, either. Food banks across the coun­try are see­ing more and more work­ing peo­ple who need help. They’re hav­ing to reduce the amount of food giv­en to each per­son or fam­i­ly because the demand has out­paced the sup­ply so much.

I can’t say that I’m sur­prised. I know too many peo­ple who are just bare­ly scrap­ing by, and it isn’t because they’re irre­spon­si­ble. It’s just how the Amer­i­can econ­o­my is, and some­thing needs to change very quick­ly.


1 http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/cobb/stories/2007/11/19/assault_1119.html

2 http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/clayton/stories/2007/11/19/riverdalesuit_1120_web.html?cxntnid=amn112007e

3 http://www.ajc.com/living/content/living/stories/2007/11/19/elephant_1120.html?cxntnid=amn112007e

4 http://www.ajc.com/holiday/content/holidayguide/stories/2007/11/19/food_1120.html?cxntnid=amn112007e

Packaging Boyhood

From the lat­est Dads & Daugh­ters newslet­ter:

Our friend Dr. Mark Tap­pan is co-author­ing a book, to be called “Pack­ag­ing Boy­hood” about mar­ket­ing to our sons. The book aims to “scru­ti­nize the world of boy pow­er, and the ways media and mar­keters’ stereo­types about how to be a man reach way down into the lives and enter­tain­ment of younger and younger boys.” Mark is writ­ing it along with Dr. Lyn Mikel Brown and Dr. Sharon Lamb, co-authors of the 2006 book Pack­ag­ing Girl­hood: Res­cu­ing Our Daugh­ters from Mar­keters’ Schemes.

To gath­er data for “Pack­ag­ing Boy­hood,” these pre­em­i­nent schol­ars on the role of gen­der in the emo­tion­al, psy­cho­log­i­cal and cul­tur­al devel­op­ment of our chil­dren put togeth­er a very inter­est­ing online sur­vey at www.packagingboyhood.com. Par­tic­i­pa­tion by dads and/or their sons will be worth­while.

Dads & Daugh­ters is a great resource for par­ents, edu­ca­tors, or any­one else who cares about chil­dren. This is the first time I’ve seen them post some­thing son-spe­cif­ic, but much of their mate­r­i­al is impor­tant regard­less of the gen­der of your child(ren). Maybe well see a Dads & Sons before long, or some­thing sim­i­lar.