Sunday and Homework

I’ve got to stop this. I keep pro­cras­ti­nat­ing each week, so I end up with a bunch of home­work to do on Sun­day. Blah. I know per­fect­ly well that I should­n’t do that, because I can’t count on being able to focus on any par­tic­u­lar day. I even advised oth­er stu­dents with FMS against pro­cras­ti­nat­ing, for that very rea­son. So why do I end up, every week, rac­ing the clock to get it all done?

Not only is it stu­pid for me, it’s a bad exam­ple for the girl. And it adds to my stress, which makes me feel worse. Stu­pid, stu­pid, stu­pid.

I know part of it is a perfectionism/OCD thing. I put it off because my brain isn’t focus­ing mar­velous­ly, even though ratio­nal­ly I know that it does­n’t ever do that any more, and I’m not going to get mag­i­cal­ly less fog­gy on Sun­day just because I have assign­ments due.

I fall into doing oth­er things, too, then get obsessed with doing them per­fect­ly and spend hours on what should have been a 15-minute job. For instance, I was just going to add the books I’m read­ing at the moment to Now Read­ing yes­ter­day, and instead of stop­ping there I end­ed up putting in a bunch of books I want to read, and com­plet­ing entry of series I read in the past, and adding images to some records that were miss­ing them, and…

This, of course, is also when I get stuck on things like, “This desk is too clut­tered. I’ve got to put some things away. Where is that piece of paper with the new doc­tor’s num­ber on it? Oh, I need to call…” Half the things that start whirring through my head as my urgent can’t even be done on the week­ends, any­way, like mak­ing appoint­ments or check­ing on my Social Secu­ri­ty claim. Mak­ing to-do lists helps get some of them out of my head, but I don’t need to be mak­ing lists or blog­ging or any­thing else. I need to be study­ing!

I just real­ized that part of my “save it for Sun­day” thing has to do with Sun­day being Sam’s pod­cast­ing day. If he’s avail­able, I’d rather spend time with him than study. He won’t be avail­able on Sun­day, so I know I won’t have any­thing bet­ter to do then. It would be far more func­tion­al, though, to be work­ing on next week’s assign­ments while he’s busy, rather than scur­ry­ing to get things fin­ished on time.

This post spon­sored by Cyn’s dys­func­tion­al brain

The Myth About Homework

As the days go by, Katie’s time gets more and more pre­cious. I’m not the only one who is miss­ing lazy days of cud­dling up to do our lessons togeth­er at our own pace, doing as much as is need­ed and no more, then going on to Girl Scouts or dance or friends.

Every night, every week­end is full of more and more home­work. Some of it is very obvi­ous­ly work for the sake of assign­ing home­work. She has four class­es, and only two of the teach­ers assign home­work. I can’t begin to imag­ine when she’d sleep if she were tak­ing four “seri­ous” cours­es, but we’ll know next semes­ter, when she adds a third one.

So this arti­cle real­ly hit home. It’s some­thing we railed about when Sam’s chil­dren lived with us, and now it’s an issue for our fam­i­ly again.

Think hours of slog­ging are help­ing your child make the grade? Think again

Too much home­work brings dimin­ish­ing returns. Coop­er’s analy­sis of dozens of stud­ies found that kids who do some home­work in mid­dle and high school score some­what bet­ter on stan­dard­ized tests, but doing more than 60 to 90 min. a night in mid­dle school and more than 2 hr. in high school is asso­ci­at­ed with, gulp, low­er scores.

I sup­pose it’s time to start cam­paign­ing, which means first get­ting involved in oth­er ways. You can’t walk in with a com­plaint and expect to be heard very well if you haven’t already estab­lished your­self as a pos­i­tive asset.