Review: So Mote It Be by Isobel Bird

Note: This is an ancient review, orig­i­nal­ly pub­lished 10 March 2001, that I’m just now con­vert­ing to Word­Press.

Last night I took advan­tage of the qui­et due to hav­ing two kids gone on a camp­ing trip to read So Mote It Be, the first book of Iso­bel Bird’s Cir­cle of Three series.

I’d heard about this series on a cou­ple of pagan mail­ing lists, but nobody seemed to have actu­al­ly read them yet. I was, how­ev­er, some­what intrigued by the thought of a Wic­can (sup­pos­ed­ly one with 20 years of expe­ri­ence and a good rep­u­ta­tion) writ­ing books aimed at the teen mar­ket that loves Charmed and Buffy and so on. The books were sup­posed to be bet­ter done and more respon­si­bly writ­ten than the sim­i­lar series Sil­ver Raven­wolf has start­ed, and I knew my daugh­ter would be want­i­ng to read them as soon as she saw or heard about them, so I fig­ured I’d go ahead and screen book one.

(Yes, we do gen­er­al­ly screen music, books and movies before our kids are exposed to them—we don’t cen­sor much except graph­ic vio­lence, but we do choose to dis­cuss our con­cerns about var­i­ous media very open­ly with our kids.)

I don’t real­ly like teen genre books—it’s been a few too many years since I obsessed over look­ing right at school and whether a par­tic­u­lar per­son would ask me to a dance for me to relate. And I didn’t even like the few that were out when I was a teen—I was read­ing C.S. Lewis, Robert Hein­lein, Frank Her­bert and Mar­i­on Zim­mer Bradley. But I was pleas­ant­ly sur­prised that the book wasn’t that painful, and for the genre it was real­ly very well done.

As a pagan, I was impressed with how the rule of three and the rede were worked into the nov­el and made very real. The main char­ac­ter is Kate, and her con­flict between being drawn to Wic­ca (which is pre­sent­ed as a reli­gion) and being a fair­ly devout Chris­t­ian is han­dled del­i­cate­ly and cer­tain­ly not resolved in the first book, which is, I think, real­is­tic. Kate’s fears of being ostra­cized if her old friends (the pop­u­lar crowd in their high school) found out she was prac­tic­ing witch­craft are very real. The prac­tic­ing Wic­cans are por­trayed very pos­i­tive­ly, and tarot read­ing is pre­sent­ed as a method of explor­ing choic­es and gain­ing insight rather than some sil­ly card trick.

In short, I have absolute­ly no reser­va­tions about let­ting my 10-year-old daugh­ter read this book and the oth­ers in the series (although I plan to read them, as well, first.) I do think the appeal of the books will be among 9–12 year olds, but real­ize that my per­cep­tions there may be skewed. (Katie just bought her own copy of The Mists of Aval­on because she loves that book so much, so she isn’t real­ly read­ing on what the pub­lic school sys­tem would con­sid­er her “grade lev­el.”)

I did have two lit­tle gripes about the books—the author must not know many 9-year-olds, because she por­trayed one briefly with behav­ior and dia­logue more appro­pri­ate to a 5-year-old. Our kids are 9, 10 and 12 and we have anoth­er 9-year-old who spends a lot of time here. We host kids’ gam­ing groups here every week­end or at least every oth­er week­end, when 10 to 15 kids from who are 8 to 13 years old are here for much of the week­end. I know kids in that age range very well, and don’t know even one who would even think of speak­ing the dia­logue giv­en to Meg. And the idea that the main char­ac­ters found a book of spells in their high school library pushed tripped my unbe­liev­abil­i­ty trigger—do you real­ly think any pub­lic school in the US would have such a thing on their shelves in this day and age, when even Madeleine L’Engle is often con­sid­ered too witchy?

Any­way, we’ll prob­a­bly be buy­ing the oth­er books in this series as they come out, and I can only rec­om­mend them to oth­er par­ents and their young read­ers. Do read them and dis­cuss them with your kids. If your kids like these, I’d sug­gest that they check out Diane Duane’s Wiz­ardry series, too (So You Want to Be a Wiz­ard is book one) and maybe the Chrestom­an­ci series by Diana Wynne Jones. Robin Wood’s mar­velous exam­i­na­tion of ethics, When, Why… If, also pro­vides excel­lent mate­r­i­al for fam­i­ly dis­cus­sions (and if the char­ac­ters of So Mote It Be had read Robin’s book first, there prob­a­bly wouldn’t have been a plot).

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Ooo! Bad Author! No Author Biscuit!


I just fin­ished read­ing the all three books that are cur­rent­ly avail­able in the Mor­ris & Chas­tain Super­nat­ur­al Inves­ti­ga­tions series by Justin Gus­tai­nis. I have no com­plaints about Black Mag­ic Woman or Evil Ways, which hang togeth­er pret­ty close­ly.

Sym­pa­thy for the Dev­il, though, end­ed with a cliffhang­er! How dare he! The read­er is left com­plete­ly unsure of the fate of one of the main two char­ac­ters, as well as sev­er­al oth­ers who were piv­otal to the plot. Hon­est­ly, any­body who is read­ing vol­ume three of a series has proven enough com­mit­ment that there’s sim­ply no jus­ti­fi­ca­tion for such a cheap tac­tic. Bah!

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Review: Spider’s Bite by Jennifer Estep

Spider's Bite (Elemental Assassin, #1)Spider’s Bite by Jen­nifer Estep
My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars

I enjoyed it this book, and plan to go on to the next book in the series, Web of Lies. I’m hop­ing that Jen­nifer Estep grows as an author, though, as the fore­shad­ow­ing regard­ing the real “big bad” as well as the rev­e­la­tion of a fact impor­tant to the main char­ac­ter were both rather clum­si­ly done, in my opin­ion.

I’m aware of anoth­er series by Estep, Big­time. I was think­ing of read­ing it, but it was writ­ten ear­li­er than the Ele­men­tal Assas­sin series, and now I’m not so sure about whether I want to read it or not. Estep’s char­ac­ters are inter­est­ing, but I’m not sure that they’re inter­est­ing enough to hold me through writ­ing that’s less pol­ished than Spider’s Bite. Then again, I’ve cer­tain­ly read worse. I sup­pose it all depends on what I hap­pen to have in hand at any giv­en time. I’d be more like­ly to read it if there were short sto­ries avail­able sim­i­lar to the ones on Estep’s web site that drew me in to this series.

I didn’t do reviews for those, but there are three sto­ries that occur chrono­log­i­cal­ly before Spider’s Bite: Poi­son Web of Deceit and Spider’s Bar­gain. Read­ing them cer­tain­ly isn’t nec­es­sary to enjoy the nov­el, and it’s def­i­nite­ly bet­ter to avoid read­ing Web of Deceit first. They are good sto­ries, though, and I do rec­om­mend that any­one who enjoys Estep’s work seek them out in order to enjoy the addi­tion­al bits of infor­ma­tion gained in them. For instance, Spider’s Bar­gain is the sto­ry of an event that is piv­otal to Gin and Caine’s rela­tion­ship, and its con­se­quences are like­ly to con­tin­ue echo­ing through the next few vol­umes of the series.

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Review: Moon Fever (anthology)

Moon Fever (Includes: Primes, #6.5)Moon Fever by Susan Size­more
My rat­ing: 1 of 5 stars

This was one of those “I fin­ished the last thing I was read­ing and I’m bored, what’s already loaded on the iTouch?” reads. It was on there because the anthol­o­gy includes Lori Han­de­land’s “Cob­webs Over the Moon” (Night­crea­tures, #10) and I read all of that series a while back. I didn’t care to read the rest of the anthol­o­gy at the time, but I hadn’t got­ten around to delet­ing the book. Ah, hap­py dig­i­tal pack­rat am I!

If I’ve read any­thing by Susan Size­more oth­er than “Tempt­ing Fate” (Primes #6.5), it was emi­nent­ly for­get­table. I’m absolute­ly sure that I haven’t read any­thing else in her Primes series, because I prob­a­bly would have thrown said mate­r­i­al firm­ly into the near­est hard sur­face (or what­ev­er the equiv­a­lent is with bytes) because of the insane­ly annoy­ing num­ber of times Size­more feels it nec­es­sary to remind us that her vam­pires are Primes! Alpha Primes! They are! Real­ly! And that means they fight a lot! Espe­cial­ly over women! Oth­er­wise, it’s a Mary Jane sto­ry set in New Orleans. I have a strong feel­ing that most of the Primes series is Mary Jane-ish, but I may at some point be trapped and forced with the prospect of star­ing at the inside of my eye­balls or read­ing more of Sizemore’s stuff. I’m not sure which would be worse right now. I’ll get back to you on that.

The Dark­ness With­in” by Mag­gie Shayne feels ter­ri­bly famil­iar, although I’m sure I haven’t read it before. I have, how­ev­er, read oth­er Shayne novel­las in oth­er antholo­gies, and this sto­ry fol­lows a famil­iar pat­tern. Sexy gal who doesn’t think she’s attrac­tive has had a run of hard luck and may lose the house she has bought rel­a­tive­ly recent­ly and loves. Said house has a spooky past that she didn’t know about when she bought it. Stal­wart too-sexy-for-her man gets involved some­how, prefer­ably in a way that allows her to ques­tion his motives. They are inex­plic­a­bly drawn to each oth­er and screw like bun­nies (or near as makes no dif­fer­ence), then blame their lapse in judge­ment on what­ev­er weird­ness is going on in the house. (Yep, that’s what they all say — and no safer sex any­where! Does para­nor­mal activ­i­ty pre­clude dis­cus­sion of sex­u­al his­to­ry and pre­vent STD trans­mis­sion?)

Cob­webs Over the Moon” by Lori Han­de­land (Night­crea­tures, #10) isn’t the most log­i­cal entry in that series. Nei­ther is it the most illog­i­cal — but by the tenth entry, the series’ mythol­o­gy has got­ten a bit ridicu­lous, so I don’t know why I even both­er bring­ing up some­thing as irrel­e­vant as log­ic. Sil­ly me! In every book, we’re intro­duced to a woman who is in some way tan­gled up with were­wolves, then to a man who is tan­gled up with her and/or the crea­tures and, of course, whose loy­al­ties are uncer­tain. There is always an ele­ment of dan­ger to add spice to the romance that has to grow between the two. The for­mu­la nev­er changes at all. There are always evil were­wolves, but some­times there are also good ones. If you like pre­dictabil­i­ty in your para­nor­mal romance, Night­crea­tures is a great series for you.

I sup­pose Cari­dad Piñeiro’s “Crazy for the Cat” isn’t tech­ni­cal­ly any bet­ter or worse than any of the oth­er three sto­ries. There’s more vari­ety in the shapeshift­ing and the main set­ting is the Ama­zon jun­gle. I couldn’t get past the big­otry and colo­nial­ism, though. Dark is bad, light is good, of course! Those poor benight­ed natives couldn’t pos­si­bly han­dle a few rogues with­out that white woman, could they? Spare me.

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Book Review: The Horns of Elfland edited by Ellen Kushner and Delia Sherman

The Horns of Elfland The Horns of Elfland by Ellen Kush­n­er

My rat­ing: 3 of 5 stars
It took a while to track down this vol­ume, as it has long been out of print. Inter­li­brary loan was, once again, my friend. But how odd to read an actu­al phys­i­cal book again, when I’ve been read­ing ebooks almost exclu­sive­ly late­ly! Read the rest of this entry »

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Review: Blood Oath by Christopher Farnsworth

Blood Oath Blood Oath by Christo­pher Farnsworth

My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars
Blood Oath is an inter­est­ing and fair­ly refresh­ing vari­a­tion on the vam­pire riff. Most of the cur­rent tales give us a suave, sexy preda­tor who mes­mer­izes his or her prey, leav­ing humans pin­ing for their pres­ence. They might even fall in love with a human. Nathaniel Cade, how­ev­er, refers to humans as food, say­ing, “Would you have sex with a cow?” That makes much more sense to me. It’s a good thing he isn’t inter­est­ed, either, as the typ­i­cal reac­tion peo­ple have to encoun­ter­ing him is utter pan­ic, often involv­ing the loss of blad­der con­trol. Read the rest of this entry »

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Reviews: Various Short Stories

I just fin­ished read­ing a bunch of dif­fer­ent short sto­ries that have been lurk­ing in var­i­ous pro­grams on my iTouch. While they are reviewed in sep­a­rate entries on GoodReads, I’m going to try to put the reviews in one blog post. Read the rest of this entry »

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Book Review: Night’s Edge

Night's Edge Night’s Edge by Mag­gie Shayne

My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars
“Dancers in the Dark” by Char­laine Har­ris is set in the same uni­verse as the South­ern Vampire/Sookie Stack­house sto­ries, but with none of the incred­i­bly annoy­ing char­ac­ters. How refresh­ing! Read the rest of this entry »

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Review: At Grave’s End by Jeaniene Frost

At Grave's End (Night Huntress, #3) At Grave’s End by Jeaniene Frost

My review


rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars
Cat is def­i­nite­ly com­ing into her own now, and her rela­tion­ship with Bones is por­trayed far more health­ily than most in the para­nor­mal romance cat­e­go­ry. I love the fact that she demands that he per­mit her to stand as his equal, rather than treat her like a del­i­cate thing to be pro­tect­ed.

The plot is more inter­est­ing than I recall in pre­vi­ous excur­sions, while build­ing on the ear­li­er books. I know there’s anoth­er vol­ume either planned or on the shelves, and I plan to read it. I wasn’t so sure after the last book, but I’m glad I gave this one a chance.

I still con­tend that the cov­er art, no mat­ter how love­ly, shows a woman in a posi­tion that can­not be obtained by any human who wants to walk again. Cat is sup­posed to be half-vam­pire, but that hasn’t been said to give her more flexibility—increased strength, speed, and heal­ing pow­er, yes, but not this sort of odd­i­ty. Yes, it’s a minor nit to pick, but it has bugged me since the first time I saw the cov­er.

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Review: Wicked Game by Jeri Smith-Ready

Wicked Game (WVMP Radio, #1) Wicked Game by Jeri Smith-Ready

My review

I give up. I just don’t care what hap­pens to any­body in this book. Back to the library with it!

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