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TotD: Eating and Drinking

This pas­sage remind­ed me of Sam:

Peo­ple ask me: Why do you write about food, and eat­ing and drink­ing? Why don’t you write about the strug­gle for pow­er and secu­ri­ty, and about love, the way oth­ers do?

They ask it accus­ing­ly, as if I were some­how gross, unfaith­ful to the hon­or of my craft.

The eas­i­est answer is to say that, like most oth­er humans, I am hun­gry.

But there is more than that. It seems to me that our three basic needs, for food and secu­ri­ty and love, are so mixed and min­gled and entwined that we can­not straight­ly think of one with­out the oth­ers. So it hap­pens that when I write of hunger, I am real­ly writ­ing about love and the hunger for it … and then the warmth and rich­ness and fine real­i­ty of hunger sat­is­fied … and it is all one.

The Art of Eating
From The Art of Eat­ing by M.F.K. Fish­er

3 comments

  1. Hope says:

    There are some amaz­ing sto­ries about pow­er and secu­ri­ty and love, told via eat­ing and drink­ing. Choco­lat, Gar­den Spells, and Like Water for Choco­late come imme­di­ate­ly to mind.

  2. cyn says:

    That reminds me of a Chi­nese movie I saw years ago at somebody’s house. Every­thing cen­tered around food, but the food itself wasn’t the mes­sage. But now I can’t remem­ber the name of it!

    I adore Choco­lat, and only found out fair­ly recent­ly that it was based on a nov­el. The author has writ­ten at least one sequel, too!

  3. Hope says:

    I haven’t actu­al­ly see the movie Choco­lat yet, just read the book — it’s an out­stand­ing read, and I do want to see the movie at some point. The sequel sounds com­pelling, too.

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