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Sunday and Homework

I’ve got to stop this. I keep pro­cras­ti­nat­ing each week, so I end up with a bunch of home­work to do on Sun­day. Blah. I know per­fect­ly well that I shouldn’t do that, because I can’t count on being able to focus on any par­tic­u­lar day. I even advised oth­er stu­dents with FMS again­st pro­cras­ti­nat­ing, for that very rea­son. So why do I end up, every week, rac­ing the clock to get it all done?

Not only is it stu­pid for me, it’s a bad exam­ple for the girl. And it adds to my stress, which makes me feel worse. Stu­pid, stu­pid, stu­pid.

I know part of it is a perfectionism/​OCD thing. I put it off because my brain isn’t focus­ing mar­velous­ly, even though ratio­nal­ly I know that it doesn’t ever do that any more, and I’m not going to get mag­i­cal­ly less fog­gy on Sun­day just because I have assign­ments due.

I fall into doing oth­er things, too, then get obsessed with doing them per­fect­ly and spend hours on what should have been a 15-min­ute job. For instance, I was just going to add the books I’m read­ing at the moment to Now Read­ing yes­ter­day, and instead of stop­ping there I end­ed up putting in a bunch of books I want to read, and com­plet­ing entry of series I read in the past, and adding images to some records that were miss­ing them, and…

This, of course, is also when I get stuck on things like, “This desk is too clut­tered. I’ve got to put some things away. Where is that piece of paper with the new doctor’s num­ber on it? Oh, I need to call…” Half the things that start whirring through my head as my urgent can’t even be done on the week­ends, any­way, like mak­ing appoint­ments or check­ing on my Social Secu­ri­ty claim. Mak­ing to-do lists helps get some of them out of my head, but I don’t need to be mak­ing lists or blog­ging or any­thing else. I need to be study­ing!

I just real­ized that part of my “save it for Sun­day” thing has to do with Sun­day being Sam’s pod­cast­ing day. If he’s avail­able, I’d rather spend time with him than study. He won’t be avail­able on Sun­day, so I know I won’t have any­thing bet­ter to do then. It would be far more func­tion­al, though, to be work­ing on next week’s assign­ments while he’s busy, rather than scur­ry­ing to get things fin­ished on time.

This post spon­sored by Cyn’s dys­func­tion­al brain

4 comments

  1. Barbara Ballard says:

    I find that a *good* task man­age­ment sys­tem (Get­ting Things Done, Fly­La­dy, etc.) helps enor­mous­ly. GTD, in par­tic­u­lar, has “con­texts”. What I do with con­texts involves brain states: her­mit, socia­ble, easy, thought, etc. Add that to a good dead­line sys­tem, and things get eas­ier. No more hun­dred lit­tle things fly­ing around in my head, they are writ­ten down.

    My cur­rent love is Omni­Fo­cus (Mac only). I sit down at the com­put­er, check out my list, change con­text if nec­es­sary, and do some­thing that real­ly needs to get done. The trick is that you must actu­al­ly review the sta­tus of all your projects and goals, about once a week. But that 15 – 30 min­utes saves me 3 hours over the course of the week.

  2. lceel says:

    All of the exter­nal tricks and memes and oth­er things meant to help you get on track won’t and usu­al­ly don’t work. The rea­son is sim­ple. You aren’t hav­ing fun in school. If things WERE fun, you’d do them first. But they’re not. They’re a CHORE. And chores are always easy to put off. Because they aren’t fun. And fun ALWAYS comes first. As it should be.

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