Well, that was fun. Not really.

I feel like I’ve dri­ven across the state, when I really spent very lit­tle time in the car today — for an Atlantan.

We went to see Katie’s doc­tor, fill­ing out the inevitable “It’s Jan­u­ary!” paper­work. Do they think peo­ple always move from one Janaury to the next, or what? I mean, when we sign in, there’s a form that asks if there’s been any change in our con­tact infor­ma­tion or insur­ance, and we say “No,” unless the answer is “Yes,” in which case we ask for the forms so that we can update the records. Appar­ently cur­rent admin­is­tra­tive thought is that clients can­not be trusted that far, so they make us do all the forms again every Jan­u­ary. In every office. Between me and Katie, that’s a lot of extra forms being filled out for no par­tic­u­lar reason.

We picked up pre­scrip­tions in two places. We dropped off pre­scrip­tions. We went to the bank. We dropped off a util­ity pay­ment to avoid the elec­tronic pay­ment fee. I know we did some­thing else, but my mind is gone.

Oh! We stopped at Dairy Queen to get the girl a Bliz­zard, too.

I also made umpty-​​million phone calls, or again, that’s what it feels like. The Blue­tooth head­set got much use!

One of Katie’s doc­tors is out of town “because her mother passed.” For three weeks! Okay, she’s from India, it’s a long way from here. But she doesn’t have any­one cov­er­ing for her! Nobody! That’s just insane! I mean, part of being a doc­tor is hav­ing rela­tion­ships with other doc­tors so you can cover for each other, right? Or you hire some­one from an agency to do it. I hap­pen to know that there are agen­cies that just cover for doc­tors who are unavail­able. Her office said, “If it’s an emer­gency, call 911.”

There are some things that are urgent but not 911-​​worthy, you know? Espe­cially when you’re look­ing at three weeks before the doc­tor will even be check­ing her messages!

We didn’t really “click” with that doc­tor, but there was iner­tia. Not any more. I’ll be find­ing a new doc­tor to replace her tomorrow.

I also con­tin­ued my attempts to reach my “Career Ser­vices Advi­sor” for a school assign­ment. By the end of the semes­ter, I’m sup­posed to have had “help” with my resume and a cover let­ter for a spe­cific job. I finally got the name of the right per­son today, but the other per­son I’d been directed to first couldn’t be arsed to for­ward my email to her. So I filled out the forms she wanted me to com­plete for her (you can’t ask a jan­i­tor for direc­tions to the restrooms at DeVry with­out fill­ing out a form or three), and asked her those ques­tions yet again.

I learned that the “life­time” career ser­vices for DeVry grads are actu­ally lim­ited to six months after grad­u­a­tion. Damn. I do hope my life­time is much longer than that, or those stu­dent loan peo­ple will be SOL.

Now Sam is home, we’ve eaten, the girl is out with her cur­rent beau, and I have absolutely no rea­son to think I even need to know where my shoes are for the next 24 hours or so. That means I can take my pain med­ica­tions again. Yay!

4 Comments

  1. Hope says:

    Good luck with the new doc­tor! I’ve been very lucky with mine. I’m sorry it was a tough day, but I am glad you’ll be able to recu­per­ate tonight and tomorrow :)

  2. sraun says:

    Given the num­ber of employ­ers who have plan changes as of 1/​1, I’m not sur­prised that clin­ics have a ‘tell us every­thing’ pol­icy for your first visit of the year.

  3. cyn says:

    Hey, smart man! I didn’t even think about that, Scott.

    Thanks, Hope :-)

  4. Janni says:

    Good luck it is always a big thing to find a new doctor.